Pressure Cooker Tomato Soup

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I’ve been using a stove top pressure cooker, for a month now.  I never realized how simple it is to make a delightful dish. I’ve been cooking mostly chicken, getting the most amazing, flavorful broths.  Sometimes I do soups. This one you can vary, in many ways.

Pressure cooking infuses the flavors.  Whatever you put in, you’ll surely notice.

Ingredients:

9    Roma/Plum tomatoes

2     Basil Leaves Fresh

3      Garlic Cloves

3      Cups Chicken Broth. I used broth, from a previously cooked chicken.

1/2    Large onion quartered

1        Tablespoon dried chicken broth (instead of salt and other seasonings)

Directions:

Drop tomatoes into boiled water, for a minute.  IMG_1926

Then into cold water.  IMG_1927

Now you’re able to peel the skin, and core the center.  It’s a sloppy job. It won’t take long because the pulp slides right off.  This is what you want. The rich red pulp.IMG_1930

Now! Go into your private greenhouse and collect some fresh basil leaves. IMG_1917 I have to show this, the scent it amazing.

Into the pressure cooker goes:     Tomato Pulp, Two Basil Leaves, 3 peeled Garlic Cloves, A tablespoon of seasoning. 1/2 a Large Onion, quartered. (You don’t have to chop any of these. The Pressure Cooker will take care, of it). And 3 cups Chicken Broth.  This soup is much better if you use your own. IMG_2218

Cover and put the cooker on the stove.  Bring to high pressure for 10 min.  Use slow release.IMG_1934

You can see how the ingredients have cooked down, and blended the flavors.IMG_1937

If you have an immersion blender, remove the basil, then blend for a couple, of min. I don’t so I use the regular blender.  IMG_2219

 

 

 

Return it to the stove and warm it up.  Here is where you may add cream or milk.  You might think it’s not thick enough.  Like a canned soup. But the flavors are rich, and the broth is delicate.  I have also found that if you let it sit, for a couple of hours. It’s more enjoyable.

Look who is still showing off, in the Green House……..IMG_2210

Have a lovely day and HAPPY COOKING!

 

 

More on Cowls

Nothing is better than when a box, from WEBS, shows up at your door. They had a sale (of course), and I was in Heaven. This is some of the Ella are Classic Superwash. The colors are beautiful.

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I made a few more cowls.  Size 10 1/2 round needles.

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Then I finally finished the one I started months ago.

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And another one, that’s been on the needles far too long. I had to finish them because I was running out of needles.

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Cowl Time

I made this cowl for my niece. I saw the yarn and loved the variegated colors.  It’s  Red Heart Boutique  Unforgettable.  It depends on what light you’re in, what shades show.

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It’s actually quite soft and is not heavy, around the neck.

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I had a bit of time with it. The yarn kept splitting. Still it was nice to work.

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Traveling with Arlene, Concord, MA

I’m not afraid of storms, for I’m learning how to sail my ship.
Louisa May Alcott

Arlene and I took a ride to Concord.

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This is Orchard House

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And came to the home of Louisa May Alcott, and her family

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As you walk to the entrance, around to the left you come across The School of Philosophy.

The Alcotts, and their neighbors the Emersons. practiced. believed in Transcendentalism.

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We didn’t go in here. The site wasn’t part of the tour.  These structures are very old and certainly need work.

Coming along to the entrance of the house, is a sign, showing the Little Women Garden. Each sister had

her own little patch to plant her flowers. They liked to pretend elves lived there. Later in the season I’m sure

it’s lovely. It’s still too early for blooms here.

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We were not allowed to take pictures inside her home.  I thought the museum store would have pictures or postcards.

They did, however there were only a couple, of views.  The most of the items were, her books, and writings on

Transcendentalism.

Her bedroom and writing desk.Scan04172015073215_001

They had wooden shadow boxes, showing some lovely miniatures.  We were allowed to take these pictures, before the tour.

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A photograph of Louisa May

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The plaque showing the home is, on the National Register.

It was a lovely visit. We learned a lot, about her family. The father, was a teacher, and made sure his daughters

kept journals.  Also that educating girls was just NOT done.  He had a more progressive view. All children should

receive and education.  Which had him fired from many positions.  Therefore they were quite poor. It wasn’t until

Louisa’s books were published and sold. They were able to pay their friend Emerson, for the house. And live, with an

income.

This is all part of the Minute Man National Historical Park.  Very close to this house is The Wayside. The Alcotts also lived there before they moved to their nearby home.  Actually it was lived in by three American Literary figures: Louisa May Alcott, Margaret Sidney and Nathaniel Hawthorne.  You really get a great feeling of history in this area.  This is The Wayside. It was under repairs, and won’t open till May. So we were unable to visit.

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We then went to lunch in West Concord center. There were some monuments dedicated to those who fought and died, in the Revolutionary War. We didn’t get to visit those sites. As the traffic home would be a problem. We plan on returning, in a few weeks.

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The Old Clock on the Stairs, Longfellow

 

I’ve always enjoyed Longfellow.  I though I’d take a little brake, from the freezing cold, and blizzards.

 

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The Old Clock on the Stairs

BY HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW

Somewhat back from the village street
Stands the old-fashioned country-seat.
Across its antique portico
Tall poplar-trees their shadows throw;
And from its station in the hall
An ancient timepiece says to all, —
“Forever — never!
Never — forever!”

Half-way up the stairs it stands,
And points and beckons with its hands
From its case of massive oak,
Like a monk, who, under his cloak,
Crosses himself, and sighs, alas!
With sorrowful voice to all who pass, —
“Forever — never!
Never — forever!”

By day its voice is low and light;
But in the silent dead of night,
Distinct as a passing footstep’s fall,
It echoes along the vacant hall,
Along the ceiling, along the floor,
And seems to say, at each chamber-door, —
“Forever — never!
Never — forever!”

Through days of sorrow and of mirth,
Through days of death and days of birth,
Through every swift vicissitude
Of changeful time, unchanged it has stood,
And as if, like God, it all things saw,
It calmly repeats those words of awe, —
“Forever — never!
Never — forever!”

In that mansion used to be
Free-hearted Hospitality;
His great fires up the chimney roared;
The stranger feasted at his board;
But, like the skeleton at the feast,
That warning timepiece never ceased, —
“Forever — never!
Never — forever!”

There groups of merry children played,
There youths and maidens dreaming strayed;
O precious hours! O golden prime,
And affluence of love and time!
Even as a miser counts his gold,
Those hours the ancient timepiece told, —
“Forever — never!
Never — forever!”

From that chamber, clothed in white,
The bride came forth on her wedding night;
There, in that silent room below,
The dead lay in his shroud of snow;
And in the hush that followed the prayer,
Was heard the old clock on the stair, —
“Forever — never!
Never — forever!”

All are scattered now and fled,
Some are married, some are dead;
And when I ask, with throbs of pain,
“Ah! when shall they all meet again?”
As in the days long since gone by,
The ancient timepiece makes reply, —
“Forever — never!
Never — forever!”

Never here, forever there,
Where all parting, pain, and care,
And death, and time shall disappear, —
Forever there, but never here!
The horologe of Eternity
Sayeth this incessantly, —
“Forever — never!
Never — forever!”

Still Snowing South of Boston

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This is from the other night. All seemed peaceful

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This morning with a few more inches..lots of wind.

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From my kitchen window, it comes up the window

half way

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My front yard, almost to the top of the lamp light

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My gas grill is under this

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The view from the porch to the pump house

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Birds still finding food

Like they said it would.  It stopped around 11AM,  There is wind but not much. We should be getting high winds and low temps soon.  My area got around a foot. I’m still unable to open any doors. Still I got some photos.

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